The Growing Risk of Online Fraud

Andrew Macleod, Editorial Staff

No matter how beneficial something is, there are always unintended consequences. One of the unintended consequences of the recent boom in technological advances is that it has made credit card fraud a much bigger problem for banks and customers alike. A growing reliance on credit and debit cards as a primary form of payment combined with the increasing popularity of e-commerce has provided plenty of... Read More »

Light Turns Green for Consumer Class Actions. (For Employees, the Light’s Still Red)

Tom LaPointe, Publisher

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently announced a new rule barring companies from using contractual clauses to force consumers to forgo litigation and take grievances into arbitration instead. This clears a fresh path for class-action lawsuits against a wide variety of businesses, including phone and cable companies, banks, restaurant chains, department stores, e-commerce giants, and app-based car and cleaning businesses. Read More »

Debt-Equity Changes: What You Need To Know

Erika Espin, Editorial Staff

Debt-equity regulations may be getting an overhaul, and many of the Obama-era tax rules are allegedly either going to be rescinded or modified. This comes about from a presidential order to make the tax code simpler. But this would also turn some corporate debt into equity and change the value-transferred interest rules when it comes to estate tax. Read More »

Intellectual Property v. Cheaper Medicines? The Dance Continues

Tom LaPointe, Publisher

The Supreme Court earlier this month handed a victory to those seeking quick access to biosimilars—near-replicas of biotechnology drugs. Sandoz, a subsidiary of Novartis, wanted to market the FDA-approved drug Zarxio, a biosimilar, cost-competitive version of Amgen ’s Neupogen, developed for immune system support during chemotherapy. Read More »

Latest News

Week of July 24th

Supreme Court’s New Bankruptcy Rules: Navigating and Coping with Changes LIVE Webcast

Bankruptcy
Supreme Court's New Bankruptcy Rules Navigating and Coping with Changes Thursday, October 26, 2017 300 pm - 500 pm (EST) [MM_Member_Decision membershipId='1' purchasedProduct='2954']$(window).load(function(){event_registration();});[/MM_Member_Decision] [event_registrant... Read More »

Week of July 17th

Intellectual Property v. Cheaper Medicines? The Dance Continues

Intellectual Property Law
Tom LaPointe, Publisher

The Supreme Court earlier this month handed a victory to those seeking quick access to biosimilars—near-replicas of biotechnology drugs. Sandoz, a subsidiary of Novartis, wanted to market the FDA-approved drug Zarxio, a biosimilar, cost-competitive version of Amgen ’s Neupogen, developed for immune system support during chemotherapy. Read More »

Debt-Equity Changes: What You Need To Know

Tax Law
Erika Espin, Editorial Staff

Debt-equity regulations may be getting an overhaul, and many of the Obama-era tax rules are allegedly either going to be rescinded or modified. This comes about from a presidential order to make the tax code simpler. But this would also turn some corporate debt into equity and change the value-transferred interest rules when it comes to estate tax. Read More »

Light Turns Green for Consumer Class Actions. (For Employees, the Light’s Still Red)

Employment Law
Tom LaPointe, Publisher

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently announced a new rule barring companies from using contractual clauses to force consumers to forgo litigation and take grievances into arbitration instead. This clears a fresh path for class-action lawsuits against a wide variety of businesses, including phone and cable companies, banks, restaurant chains, department stores, e-commerce giants, and app-based car and cleaning businesses. Read More »

The Growing Risk of Online Fraud

Business and Corporation
Andrew Macleod, Editorial Staff

No matter how beneficial something is, there are always unintended consequences. One of the unintended consequences of the recent boom in technological advances is that it has made credit card fraud a much bigger problem for banks and customers alike. A growing reliance on credit and debit cards as a primary form of payment combined with the increasing popularity of e-commerce has provided plenty of... Read More »

Week of July 10th

From the Oval Office to Yours: The HR Quagmire of Social Media

Labor Law
Andrew Macleod, Editorial Staff

Amid the commotion surrounding @realDonaldTrump on Twitter, can a Human Resources perspective offer some insights? Were President Trump a corporate executive instead, would HR interrupt this unscripted flow of updates? To protect a company from negative publicity or litigation, any corporate employee, including a CEO, will likely face discipline for sharing sensitive information or disparaging peers or competitors through social media. Read More »

Wrangling With Robocalls: The Telephone Consumer Protection Act in 2017

Technology
Erika Espin, Editorial Staff

How does the federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) interact with the increasingly automated world of websites and smart phones? What are the current risks of falling afoul of the Act or other regulations covering the telemarketing industry? A federal judge recently rejected an attempt by Delaware insurance marketer All Web Leads Inc. to dismiss a class-action suit challenging its automated phone calls. The suit, which sought both injunctive relief and monetary damages, invoked the TCPA. Read More »

Held at Ransom: The Dangerous Business of Ransomware

Technology
Tom LaPointe, Publisher

When criminal activity begins to operate like an efficient, well-developed business, bad things are bound to happen. Unfortunately, this is the state that ransom-ware and the criminals that use it is quickly evolving towards. While the concept of ransomware has been around for some time, the dangerous level of efficiency that it has recently achieved has catapulted the ransomware model to become what most cyber-security experts consider to be the next great cyber-threat. Read More »

Targeting Noncompliance: The IRS Rolls Out the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program

Finance
Andrew Macleod, Editorial Staff

The Large Business and International Division of the IRS has rolled out its Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP), which is aimed at compliance for those who were denied entry to the OVDP since 2009 or withdrew their application prior to being accepted. Approximately 6,000 taxpayers could be targets of this compliance program. The goal is to determine whether these individuals have paid their required taxes, or whether they have chosen to avoid their tax burden through noncompliance, and to what degree that has taken place. Read More »

Week of June 26th

Wearables, Hearables and Other Hot Techs To Watch in 2017

Technology
By Stacey Wegner, Jeongdong Choe and Ray Fontaine*

In 2016, wearables were extremely interesting mainly because there was so much uncertainty around whether or not the market will be viable. The year saw some truly low-cost smart and fitness devices, and some market surprises like Fitbit buying Pebble. The Apple Watch 2 was an improvement over the Watch 1. However, the Huawei watch is remarkably designed with a nice round face, and functional, making the decision on which smartwatch to buy difficult. Read More »
Showing of 74 1 2 3 8